Monthly Archives: September 2011

IPv4 and IPv6 Reverse Lookup Zone Configuration

Configuring Reverse Lookup Zones for IPv4
Now, we need to create a matching reverse lookup zone. This will handle reverse resolution for our subnet. In this case, it is 192.168.1.x.
1. Choose Start Administrative Tools DNS.
2. In the console tree, click Reverse Lookup Zones.
3. Right-click Reverse Lookup Zones, and then click New Zone.
4. When the New Zone Wizard appears, click Next.
5. On the Zone Type page, select Primary Zone, and then click Next.
6. On the Reverse Lookup Zone Name page, make sure IPv4 is selected, and then click Next.
7. On the Reverse Lookup Zone Name page, in the Network ID field, type the start of the subnet range of your network (in this case, 192.168.1.x), and then click Next.
8. On the Zone File page, click Next.
9. On the Dynamic Update page, click Next.
10. On the Completing The New Zone Wizard page, click Finish.

Configuring Reverse Lookup Zones for IPv6
1. In the console tree, click Reverse Lookup Zones.
2. Right-click Reverse Lookup Zones, and then click New Zone.
3. When the New Zone Wizard appears, click Next.
4. On the Zone Type page, select Primary Zone, and then click Next.
5. On the Reverse Lookup Zone Name page, make sure IPv6 is selected, and then click Next.
6. In the Reverse Lookup Zone Name field, type in the prefix, and then click Next.
7. On the Dynamic Update page, choose Allow Both Nonsecure And Secure Dynamic Updates, and click Next.
8. Click Finish to create the New Zone.

Create IPv6 Record:

1.Rright-click the Primary Lookup Zone for your domain, and then click New Host.
2. In the Name field, enter the name of your server or ws.
3. In the IP address field, enter the IPv6 address we set for the server.
4. Verify that Create Associated Pointer (PTR) Record is checked, and click Add Host.
You should now see a new AAAA record for the server, as well as a new PTR record in the Reverse Lookup Zone we created.

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How to Reset Local Group Policy Objects to default settings

Sometimes viruses or people use  Group Policy against us and we need to reset it back to the default. It can control access to a number of things in windows from logon scripts to access to the screensaver settings. Resetting it is actually pretty simple, which is why you shouldn’t rely on it solely to guard your network.

 

Group Policy

1. If you need to clear IPSec settings and software restriction settings do these two sub-steps, otherwise go on to the second step:
a. reg delete hklm\software\policies\microsoft /f
b. regedit /s “c:\policies.reg” (where c:\policies.reg is the exported hklm\software\policies\microsoft hive of a virgin or target configured machine)
2. Issue this magical command to reset the rest of the GPO settings to their defaults (enter this all on one line):
secedit /configure /db reset /cfg “c:\windows\security\templates\setup security.inf” /overwrite
3. Delete the registry.pol file if it exists:
del c:\windows\system32\grouppolicy\machine\registry.pol

Don’t forget to reboot! All the group policies should now be reset to default. Works with XP, 2000, 2003 and 2008.